Submission Guidelines

The Art of Autism takes submissions of art work and poetry on a continuous basis. We update the website quarterly with art. We are now paying neurodivergent bloggers for posts. See our criteria here.

We look for guest bloggers on a variety of subjects including but not limited to:

1. First-hand accounts from autistic people
2. Articles on art, music, or poetry
3. Spirituality and autism
4. Transformative accounts
5. Special Education
6. Sibling Stories
7. Parent Stories
8. Stories about innovative programs
9. Profiles of autistic people
10. Advocacy articles
11. Articles about employment and transition
12. Topical human-interest stories
13. Book and movie reviews
14. First Person Mental health accounts
15. International and National month themes – see why April, May, September, October and November have important themes for us.

Our policy on articles about therapies

Articles on therapies that we post on the Art of Autism are articles that treat people with dignity and that are in alignment with our mission – such as music and art therapy, equestrian therapy, and therapies which empower the person to have control over their emotions and enhance their lives, such as social stories. We do not post articles that are about curing autism or about what caused a person’s autism, such as vaccine articles. We do post articles from autistic people about therapies they believe helped them.

What we don’t post

We do not publish blogs that use disempowering language or have ableist content. See our view on autism here.

Article Submission Guidelines

Articles should be 800 – 2000 words in .docx or .txt format and a head-shot of the writer and bio is required in a separate email. If the blog is about art please include samples of your art ready for publishing on the web properly named – the filename should include your name and the name of the piece of art. Photos should have the name of the person in the photo or a description of the photo. Please do not include photos, art and headshot as part of the text.

The benefit of posting your blog post on the Art of Autism is portfolio building, promotion, and the chance to be read by many people. The Art of Autism has received 1 million unique views in the last year. We average about 4000 views a day. Submissions and inquiries can be made to info @artautism.com. For those who don’t know the rules for email, we’ve posted email etiquette here.  We’ve also published 9 tips for writing engaging blogs.

Right to Decline Submissions

The Art of Autism has the right to decline any submission. 

Sponsored Posts

On occasion, The Art of Autism will post a blog from a sponsor. The blog posts we accept must follow the above considerations.  Our fee is $35 for a sponsored post.

Header Image: Wen of Zen “Brain on Spectrum”

14 Comments

  • Hello,

    My name is Harris Baker and I am an associate at Glenmont Consulting and I’m looking for guest posting/collaborative opportunities for my client, Thread Learning.

    Thread Learning builds a data collection, analysis and coordinated care platform for autism education. Teachers, managers, parents, and students can all benefit from this approach.

    My team and I are extremely active in the ABA/Autism space and were recently highlighted in a Cornell Tech publication: http://bit.ly/2CxvacX. Our clients include BCBAs, Special Need Schools and data collection companies.

    I see you have suggested topics and submission guidelines which is wonderful, but I’m wondering if there’s anything specific you have in mind we can collaborate on.

    I look forward to your reply!

      • Understood. Thanks for your reply. If there’s ever anything you think we can collaborate on in the future, please feel free to contact me!

  • Hounds of a Hell

    When the hounds of a hell are at your heels,
    Fear tripping up reason.
    It’s then easier to return to Plato’s Cave.
    I usually sit in the corner, the one often wearing a dunce cap.

    Alas, hope & a ride on the good luck dragon glimmer still,
    Heart & Choice sets thee FREE!
    Hold hands, hug, and rejoice in thanks.
    Grateful that Love helps all LIVE!

    Dear Fathers, gather round the bosom of Mother Earth.
    Love her like she’s truly yours to love. Respect her and she’ll return blessings indefinitely.

    – Bicentennial girl
    Ai-icia Page (honestly!)

    *a poem I wrote. I think in pictures and had a rather rough childhood and am trying to focus on using my sometimes volatile states (I even wear loud clothing, it calms me to make people uncomfortable. I feel akin to others who would go to the lengths of studying just enough various law to better grasp social understandings.) Unemployed and cannot pass those personality tests so prevalent these days. So, I write 🙂 Much is posted to my facebook page.

  • Hello , I’m Eduardo’s Mom , he has autism , he is 8 years old and he is an artistic boy , painting and drawing beautiful pictures that I’d like to share with you , thanks a lot

  • Hey all,
    I’m not here for myself, but for a friend of mine… let’s share a story.

    I met him about a year ago while I was running around as a steampunk pirate going to events and such.
    His name is Warren, autistic but so talented my brain actually started hurting. His story is a sad one, always bringing a smile to other people’s faces.
    Forever covering his face behind cosplay unless he was your friend.
    His facebook page will explain.
    https://www.facebook.com/StarRaccoonCosplay
    I would love to see him see that there is still love in the world and hope.
    Regards.

  • I’m an author with autism who has recently released a novel with a major character having autism. How can I go about having my book reviewed by your blog?

  • HI, I’m writing for my son, Matteo, who is a 15 year old autist. He has published a book called, Handbook of Us,. It is filled with amazing insight and offers unique perspectives into his unique life experiences…great for all parents/educators to read. Could we enter just one chapter or something? How does this work with books? He is also a poet and artist, so we’ll be submitting those to you as well.
    Thanks for all you are doing! This is a beautiful opportunity for the world. -Annette

  • I just learned last night that my son who is 19 years old has Aspergers. He was apparently diagnosed by a psychologist at his College about a year ago but has been afraid to tell me or his mom. He confided in my wife (his stepmom) who shared it with me on condition of my keeping of the secret. He’s very worried in particular about his stepdad who he respects a great deal and I think he may worry won’t be supportive?? In any case…

    Looking back at his childhood some things now make a bit more sense. He was way, way ahead of his classmates in first grade and would exhibit a lot of different nervous type reactions in social settings like flapping his hands. He was reading and doing math at a high level so they skipped him up to second grade.

    Even as a 2-3 year old he would obsessively organize his trains or cars. Now I see how this was kind of a marker. All through grade school he had a tough time socially etc. He had a much easier time in high school and once he got a more advanced sense of humor etc.

    He started having panic attacks a year and a half ago while counseling at a summer camp- in some tense social settings with co-workers who he wasn’t getting along well with.

    Now he’s back home after 3 semesters of school away from home.

    I found this out last night and now realize maybe I also have had slight autistic tendencies, especially while growing up. I never had any idea that this could have been what I was struggling with.

    I’ve always felt drawn to obsessively collect and organize things. I feel like I’m going to lose my marbles when there’s too much auditory stimulation going on around me. I had a super hard time socially when I was a kid. I do well now but still have a hard time understanding other people’s emotions some times.

    I took a few online quizzes today and I’m like “borderline” scores on two different tests.

    My son now has to look ahead to his life and figure out what he wants to do. I can’t let him know at this point but it would be great to get him started on seeking out some therapeutic help and (according to my wife) maybe something for his anxiety if needed or helpful.

    This is all very new to me.

  • Hi!
    Im a young girl with ADHD & Autisim! I’m really artistic and I want to share some of my artwork in this website. Can I get some help with this? As in, where do I send it and stuff? That would be really helpful! 🙂

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