Special Ed Teacher and Special Needs student Files Restraining Order on Autistic Student

KevinIhaveautism

3/13/14 Update. Kevin has trouble on the weekends and is homesick. He continues to obsess about things not being fair his Junior year in high school. I found out yesterday that his special education teacher who was put on administrative leave for the complaint I made in 2012 (his Junior year) encouraged students in her class to walk out on the last day of school to support her. Kevin was left alone in the class with the substitute teacher. A parent drove the students to the educator’s home for a party during class hours. The teacher was on administrative leave at the time while the District investigated a complaint of harassment of Kevin.
2/28/14 Update. Kevin has moved to a residential program in Ohio where he is doing well. He has a job where he works three days a week and attends daily classes. He’s in a supportive, loving environment. He’s being flown back to California in time for The Autism Chalk Festival and for a court date of April 14. Santa Barbara Superior Court judge Colleen Sterne has urged all parties to settle. The District Attorney did not pursue criminal charges based on the Sheriff’s recommendation. The teacher pursued a civil restraining order and completed restraining order forms on behalf of another Special Education student in her class. This will be Kevin’s third court appearance with this educator (two continuances prior). The first appearance, the educator brought her entire transition class and three parents of students to court even though a substitute teacher was hired by the District (she doesn’t seem to realize this is bullying behavior). The court “field trip” to view her civil case was not authorized by Carpinteria Unified School District. A private investigator has been retained by the School District’s legal counsel to investigate this matter. Kevin manifests symptoms of PTSD due to exclusion, isolation and being singled out in negative ways in this educator’s class. Kevin is highly sensitive to his environment and the moods of others, as many autistic people are. I’ve talked to a parent who say I’m being portrayed as “The Anti-christ” and Kevin’s teacher “the Angel.” Our family feels that many of Kevin’s problems now are manifestations of the hostility created in his special education class (among parents, aides, and other educators). Unfortunately, Kevin’s negative experience with this educator isn’t an isolated case.
Thanks to educators, parents, Autistic people and professionals across the globe who email and call me with support for Kevin. Thanks for all your stories.
… And to the parent or special educator who continues to spam this website and won’t identify herself, Don’t blame me. I didn’t start this. I only started posting when it was apparent that the educator spread rumors across the entire town about Kevin. Kevin had NO VOICE in the School System. Even though I requested to be at a District-wide meeting about a security threat and an autistic student (Kevin), I was not invited to attend. It’s highly unusual for a Special Educator to place a restraining order on a student and complete restraining order papers on behalf of another Special Needs student. Especially when she’s never been directly threatened or hit by that student… Maybe this has something to do with the complaint I made in 2012 when she was put on administrative leave while an investigation was made of her harassment of Kevin.

Press Release

December 23, 2013

Debra Hosseini, Carpinteria resident, was outraged yesterday when her son Kevin Hosseini, 19, received a restraining order from the Sheriff’s Office. The Restraining Order was on behalf of his Special Education teacher, a special education aide, and another student in her Special Education transition class.

The teacher is protected by the Carpinteria Teacher’s Union. Kevin Hosseini has exhibited no aggression to this teacher in the past.

As a consequence of her actions, the entire class has been alienated from Kevin. A mom of one of the students in the class sent a letter to the School Board stating that if Kevin stabbed his teacher, her son would defend the teacher.

Kevin attends the SEALS transition program for young adults with developmental disabilities. It’s a program which teaches life skills under the Special Education Department of Carpinteria Unified School District. This is the second year of the program.

Kevin is Autistic. People with autism often say whatever comes into their head. They have no filter. It is difficult for autistic people to lie. They often repeat things seen on television. Kevin has never directly threatened the teacher or aide. The threat was made indirectly when Kevin experienced a difficult medication change while at Aurora Vista Del Mar hospital. On the day Kevin went into the hospital his teacher expressed surprise sending an email saying how well Kevin was doing in the SEALS program this year.

Students with developmental disabilities are protected under federal laws. Kevin visited his psychiatrist the day after his release. He expressed pleasure at Kevin’s progress.

Kevin should have been allowed to return to school, but instead was put on “district instruction,” with an aide Eric.

Eric decided to stand by Kevin when Special Education teacher, another special educator and her aide took out an Emergency Protection Order. Kevin has been under an E.P.O. for the last week.

In addition, Kevin was banned from walking on the Middle School or High School campus.

The Middle School teacher told his teachers and staff to call 911 if Kevin goes on the campus. Kevin was banned from the High School campus as well.

Kevin can’t walk many of the streets in his home community.

In the last week, Special Education teacher filed a complaint with Santa Barbara City College, which suspended Kevin from attending his classes. Kevin and his aide Eric, were told to leave campus on Monday, by the Superintendent.

Kevin had to make special arrangements with Santa Barbara City College to complete his P.E. class and take his College Success final. Kevin is the only student in the SEALS program to take an academic class. He talked to the Dean of Student’s about his suspension for “bad behavior” here.

On Thursday, Kevin was told he could not attend his regular job at Giovanni’s Pizza. Debra had to call the Sheriff’s office to arrange Kevin to attend his job.

The Sheriff who served Kevin said, “The Captain will stand behind Kevin in court. This woman is way out of line.”

Kevin painted this of Deputy Powers and him when he was 14. Kevin likes the Sheriff's.

Kevin painted this of Deputy Powers and him when he was 14. Kevin likes the Sheriff’s.

Debra Hosseini thinks that his teacher has taken advantage of Kevin’s breakdown to avenge a complaint she made about her 18 months ago. Debra also complained when Kevin wrote this in his journal.

kevinjournalSealsProgram002

“For obvious reasons we don’t allow Kevin to play violent video games,” Debra says.

The Hosseini family feels isolated in Carpinteria. Debra feels that this one teacher has turned the entire community against her family and Kevin.

“I’m very disappointed, even people who I thought were Kevin’s friends have turned their back on him and believe he is dangerous. It seems many people lack compassion.”

Kevin has been doing better than ever. He finished his College Success class with a “B.”

“Mom, how long do I have to stay away from them?” Kevin asks. “Can I talk to them when I’m twenty-five?”

Debra wrote a blog about how to explain a restraining order to your Autistic child.

“We haven’t told Kevin very much about this, “Debra says. We don’t want him to feel bad about his disability.

Debra’s emails to the School Board, Principals, Superintendent, school psychologist, and Special Education Director have mostly gone unanswered.

“I know they are instructed to do this by their attorneys,” Debra says. “When you close down communication with parents it makes it a battle instead of cooperation. This wastes so much time, energy, and money.”

“I want Kevin to reside in a loving, compassionate community which embraces differences,” Debra says. Debra is contemplating moving out of Carpinteria herself. “I never knew so many people hated us,” she said.

In the meantime, Kevin and his aide Eric, work on life skills two hours a day at a mobile park recreation room.

“I’m disappointed that they didn’t give him the same hours as the other students because his dad and I have had to rearrange our schedule so someone is with Kevin the rest of the day.”

Debra says, “I don’t know why these teachers are so afraid. Kevin never even talks about these people.”

At this point, Debra thinks Kevin needs a restraining order from his Special Education teacher.

Debra has a solution for the School District’s dilemma about her son.

Instead of spending money on expensive attorneys defending the lawsuit against the School District and the Teacher’s Union, spend the money on the best autism program in the country.

“This would take a radical change in School District culture,” Debra says.

“I know there are many compassionate teachers in the School District, but there are many teachers who frankly shouldn’t be teaching. They are all defended by the Carpinteria School Teacher’s Union. They allowed this to happen to my son.”

Debra would like to see the School District focus on good programming for students instead of fighting parents, especially parents of students like Kevin. Kevin’s best years were when he was in the Carpinteria Family School, a parent-teacher-child cooperative. “There was an equal share of power at that school and Kevin thrived.”

Debra quit her job when Kevin was in second grade to help Kevin and people like him.

Inclusion of children like Kevin, brings compassion to our children. Kevin’s entire Senior class gave him a standing ovation when he graduated last June.

KevinIhaveautism

Photo Courtesy of Amy May Hidden Wings and Erin Clemens.

The Warrior is Carpinteria’s mascot.

The true meaning of a warrior is compassion.

Debra has set up a facebook page for Kevin End Autistic Discrimination.

Kevin is a talented artist who has art on display at the State Russian Museum in St. Petersburg. Kevin’s website is www.kevingallery.com

“Maybe Kevin is here to turn fear into compassion,” Debra says. I’m so proud of Kevin. He struggles so hard every day.”

Debra is founder of The Art of Autism www.the-art-of-autism.com a collaborative of over 300 artists, poets, entertainers, and authors on the autism spectrum. The Art of Autism focuses on the gifts of people on the autism spectrum and has exhibits and presentations throughout the United States and Canada.

30 Comments

  • JOHN NOHAI says:

    good luck kevin as a parent of a autistic son it breaks my heart to hear a sad story

  • Every parent of a special needs child can name a dozen accomplished and influential citizens who can thank their parents for having ignored professional advice. Hmmmm…. let’s see. Well… not being a parent, I can only name 2 I know personally… Temple, Stephen Shore. But I’m sure you could name more. My point being that sometimes, even the best intended professional advice is just plain wrong because its based more on a lack of information than on what is known. Even when wrong, you have to give credit to those who are actually trying to help.
    But there are also those who dwell comfortably in their ignorance…. and fear… and sometimes evil. Bullying and scapegoating, those wonderful traditions handed down from parent to child that we find so easy to rationalize are evil. But allowing ignorance and fear to cause harm, intentional or not, to others is just as evil.
    Keep up the good fight. But, if you find your strength has failed you, we will understand. That’s when its time to find a more welcoming community. You would like Indianapolis or Bloomington. Both are find a warm, progressive community that strongly support people on the spectrum and their families. And both have great universities that would support Kevin.

  • Refusing to respond to emails in response to their complaints and advocacy is retaliation, so if their attorneys advised it, they were very stupid – although I have seen school attorneys do that.

  • I would love to know all the details of this story. It feels as if alot have been left out.
    Indeed we parents of autistic children see the unbalance in the world towards Special Needs. It beomes a chalange for the entire family from day one. Yet, as a parent of one of the students in a special needs class, I too would have wanted to be notified of the danger your son posses. I have read all your blogs and other sites, and it seems that this teacher and student followed all that was needed to keep them safe from an expressed danger. Maybe your son is not a threat in your eyes, but as we see so often a child with his type autism can get set off without any prior warning.
    A parent can overlook the danger because we are so used to the signs. School shootings are on the rise, just read the papers. Just a couple months back a math teacher in another state was stabbed by a studen while she washed her hands in a school bathroom.
    There are no answers, but a teacher should have a right to protect herself and the other students in her class. At least until a judge has heard all the facts and makes a ruling.
    It is not fair to any child in her class or even your son to have them lift the restraining order before he is cleared. After that all the parents will see that there is no worry. As a parent I can say that your Special Education teacher was only acting as any good parent/educator would have by protecting the student as wll as herself. In this day and age teachers should have some sense of control. I have come to understand that these teachers are working group. They have chosen to work everyday with our kids and don’t have to. They want to!!
    I find it difficult to believe that the teacher would single out your one child unless she/he believes there needs to be more eyes on the situation. Where is the district? Where are the other parents who should be backing you up? It can not be a conspiracy of everyone! Maybe it is time to given this a rest until the system gets a chance to review it.
    I would hate to see another teacher turn in the towel over the accusations of one parent who is not backed by any other parent in the class.

    • To Another Parent’s View,

      I find your position quite emphatic and dogmatic while you have admitted that you don’t know all of the details. It seems there should be several layers of protection and means to resolve this type of matter long before a restraining order is implemented. A restraining order is a very serious undertaking! The Carpinteria School District has several highly paid professionals on staff that needed to respond to and resolve the matter immediately. Perhaps in conjunction with the mental health professionals; however, we can’t hang the individual with autism out to dry! Yes, it seems there was threatening language used which surely scared individuals. I am sure it was quite disconcerting to those who may have been verbally threatened. I think we as a community need to come along side our professionals and teachers when something like this happens and offer our sincere support and compassion as well as protection. But, the professionals are the last ones who should prematurely react if they have not already gone to the district. To have a judge involved without much more to go on seems so unfair to the person who has autism. The fact of the matter is, yes, the teachers ‘choose’ to be in the class with our kids, but it’s not like our kids are second class citizens. It’s sad that such a statement was even made. It implies that somehow being in a class with special needs kids is sooo hard that at least these people do that. Yes, it’s not an easy profession, but as they say, “Anything worth doing is usually hard.” Although not an easy profession, it’s respectable and they are indeed being paid. If your job stresses you out that’s why you are being paid! That’s with any job, but especially one that you commit to in this field. I, too, am a parent of a son who has autism. I have seen kiddos, both young and old, have an extremely difficult time with sensory overload and downright hopelessness exhibit violence. It seems this young man, Kevin, had the extremely difficult burden of dealing with a medication change. Have you ever had to deal with that? I have not and I am grateful for my son that he has not had to deal with medications. My heart goes out to Kevin and his family to have to deal with the legal implications and significant life changes of this. So, from another parent’s point of view- although I don’t know all of the details, it sounds like something that should and could have been handled within the school district. I am sorry that it has resulted in such a serious legal matter so quickly. I am not sure how one might know whether there are other parents behind this family. Perhaps you are intimately involved in the matter? Also, this type of hysterical response within the community regarding individuals with autism only makes life for our kids that much more difficult. When Kevin can’t even walk in his own neighborhood, it begins to villainize anyone with autism. It makes people who aren’t familiar with autism make broad generalizations whether we like it or not. I think that’s one of the main points this Mom is making by going public with this. To Kevin’s Mom, thank you for standing up for what is right not only for your son, but for mine too!

      • Debbie says:

        Thank you. Can you believe this is still going on? Why is this teacher still employed? There is now an investigation going on. Kevin is now in Ohio, but will be flown back in April for the restraining order court date. There are parents and professionals who are supportive in the community. i was informed yesterday, the teacher is no longer allowed to bring students to her personal residence.

        • Debra says:

          I’m beginning to believe that the so called “AnotherParentsView” is in fact the teacher (or one of her ‘allies’)who was harassing your son. She keeps whining about your ‘lack of credentials’, your “lack of qualifications”. Those are the same ‘red flags’ and “hallmarks’ that were used in other school districts in my state; where the parents of student’s with Autism tried to get their own children’s needs met.

          They must really consider you to be a ‘threat’, since you dared to stand up for your son.

          As a woman with Aspergers, as a married mom with two daughters with Aspergers; all my prayers are with you…

          • Debbie says:

            Debra, I’m convinced it was the teacher speaking through a parent in the class. Once I posted an article about that parent (not favorable) the harassing emails stopped. I took the article down because I don’t want to spread more negativity.

    • The reason that people like you win these cases, is not because you speak the truth, it’s because you wear down the soul of the people who like to live in peace.
      You strive for chaos and are determined through your media exposure, to cover up any sound of what is real.
      If the people out there could walk a mile in the shoes of those you threaten with your law suites, blogs and media frenzy, they would also be worn down.
      Your ability to make an entire town, a class of Special Needs children and their parents, suffer for your need to be in the lime light, is proof you have no thought for others.
      Perhaps you should have taken the “high road” when you saw this was making such a negative impact on so many innocent people and stopped your public display.
      When you were made aware of how it was impacting all the other children involved, didn’t that matter at all to you. But that must not be your nature.
      Now so many have lost for you to win.
      Lay down your sword and give us this all a rest.

  • Debbie says:

    Dmoll, thank you for your comments on this post. I welcome the other opinions. I have heard from two other parents of Autistic students who have problems with this teacher. They aren’t in her class now. We did try for a different program this year out of the City as we knew this teacher doesn’t like my son and has a history of yelling and excluding him (which was investigated 18 months ago). At that time the teacher was put on leave while they did the investigation. I was assured that Kevin wouldn’t be in her class again. We’ve put a buffer between her and Kevin – an aide Eric – still that didn’t seem to work. IMO, she took advantage of Kevin when he was at his weakest to try to destroy him and our family. I’ve not publicly talked about this teacher prior to this incident. I have one blog which alludes to her which is called Special Education is about people – not funding. I’ve expressed my concerns about her to a few parents. I respect other’s who have differing opinions. I did feel a need to post about Kevin as he was being portrayed as a monster and even though I’ve asked for permission to be present at an optional staff meeting my request for a representative for Kevin to talk was ignored.

    If you look at one of my latest blogs you can get a feeling for who Kevin is (it’s about our trip to Ensenada). I feel open communication and transparency can solve many problems and could have avoided this mess. Thank you for taking the time to respond. Have a nice holiday.

  • Debbie says:

    Thank you Jmoll, yet unidentified, for keeping a dialogue. Hate is such a strong word, I totally agree that there are so many factors involved. I would have liked to see an open communication, transparency and all of us get together to talk this out. Seems like a lot of misunderstandings came out of lack of communication. Hope you have a nice holiday!

  • Kelly Green says:

    To “another parent’s view”…Debra seeks justice that is all. Kevin’s difficulties have been in large part created by the toxic atmosphere he has been subjected to while in this teacher’s program. Feelings of favoritism and or dislike are not lost on Autistic people. So many folks are misguided into believing that they are not competent to perceive that and are not aware of what is going on, when in reality they absorb so much more than other people. They focus on their own experiences much more because they are not distracted with other people’s lives (as so many neurotypical people seem to be.) This entire situation has been woefully mishandled by the district allowing a teacher to work outside of the boundaries. Knee jerk reactions have been employed at every step here and that has caused so much pain. The teacher/districts inability to handle this in a loving and professional manner is the problem. Involving an entire classroom in an unnecessary courtroom proceeding is beyond anyone’s comprehension. If this teacher truly cared about her students she never would have began such turmoil by her hysterical reactions to Kevin’s break down. Adding insult to injury by recruiting other’s to her distorted perceptions. Kevin’s break down was caused by mistreatment and bullying while he is supposed to be embraced and educated. Debra only seeks to stop this from happening to Kevin and all other Autistic people. This is not a media frenzy or anything else but, the ruination of one young man’s happiness in the hometown he grew up in. I am saddened for any students subjected to this kind of unwarranted hostility.

    • Debbie says:

      Thanks Kelly, I couldn’t have said it better. I would like this to stop for other future Kevins and aides who’ve been mistreated as well. I have documentation which shows this teacher has a pattern with students and aides. Kevin isn’t an isolated case.

  • Debbie says:

    Removed all of the offensive, ignorant posts from this page today.

  • I search every day to see if the teacher has posted anything.
    Nothing has turned up. I am astonished that this is such a one sided story.
    I sent a letter to be forwarded to her by the school.
    There has been no reply.
    I also e-mailed the parent I have been in contact with and have been assured the only fault is the schools.
    It is outrageous you continue to blast the teacher when your opinion is all you produce.
    You have decided to convey that you are some kind of authority on the subject of the complex autism spectrum. Your statements hurt the credibility of parents in the real world.
    It appears you have no “spectrum” education (with no any sign of credentials).
    Your lack of professional knowledge should stop you from talking as if you are an authority on the subject.
    My child’s teacher would deserve more than your opinion to destroy her world and my child’s class. World’s should not be turned upside down based on a simple view.

    • Debbie says:

      Jmoll, Although I’ve trashed all your comments because I believe you are a parent in Kevin’s ex-class or the teacher herself and many of your comments are down-right offensive, I’m going to approve this one. So you are in another school district observing this story? And the only fault is the schools? So why are you blaming me? Keep those letter going to the school district. Maybe we can get a better education system for all. And BTW, the teacher can settle this restraining order anytime. Kevin is 2,000 miles away. And I emailed her and Mary in the class many times. We could have talked and resolved this early on. I’m sure if they sat with Kevin and really talked to him they could see he was no threat at all. No one is talking to Kevin but you all are gossiping about him and spreading awful rumors. Your little group, who has aligned themselves against our family, are bullies. It’s obvious the teacher is going after Kevin to get even with me for the complaint we made in 2012. A restraining order is devastating for a person with ASD. It will effect housing, employment, and much more. We got stopped at the border because of the restraining order. And about Kevin’s diagnoses – many Autistic people have dual-diagnoses. They are served in schools and transition programs across the country. Many Autistic people are big. They are not to be shunned, isolated, and gossiped about because of their disability or size – especially by an educator. So it’s not going like you thought it would? That’s why there are federal and state laws to protect our children.

  • I find it interesting that you feel the need to place me in close proximity to your town. I in fact live in another time zone and state. It shows your inability to accept that others do not hold with your point of view. q.com is in Az. Comcast. There is in fact over 500 miles between your situation and my child’s. The information I draw from my e-mail pal indicates that the teacher is doing well with all that has befallen her. I am hoping to travel out that way this summer with my child to visit my newest friend acquired through this situation. The distance is short when new friends are found.

  • Debbie says:

    qmoll, Your IP address points to cox.net, a local provider. And you are registered on FB as Carpinteria Parent. Please stop playing games. And ahout my qualifications, check out the latest blog – What makes a good transition program.

  • No matter the location. Your belief is unimportant. And just as you I apparently am an expert in the realm of Autism. From your point of view all parents are as knowledgeable as the experts. You have no more and no less training than I. It should however be stated as such, just a parents view, no more. Some parent out there might not understand that what you say is only from raising a son with issues and the comments of bloggers. With no formal education to back up your statements. You are only commenting.

    • Debbie says:

      Jmoll, Create your own blog and program. Empower yourself! If you need any help let me know. I’ve been doing this for years. Part of the Art of Autism mission is to help Autistic people and their parents empower themselves.

    • Debbie says:

      And read my latest blog. Most of the innovative programs are coming from parents. I’m in the process of compiling a directory of good transition programs across the country. If you would like to submit an article to the Art of Autism regarding the transition program in Carpinteria and why you like it, I’ll consider it for submission.

  • Kelly Green says:

    If ‘another parent’s view’ truly believed your points were “unimportant” Debbie they wouldn’t be here scouring over every comment made pertaining to this horrid situation. Let me see if I have this straight (?) Someone claiming to be 500 miles away aligns with someone they don’t know and “believes” is not posting “her side” of this story. A teacher with a history of disregarding professional boundaries and treating her class as her own personal possession to do with what she wants? Why would any thinking person align themselves with that?

    Trying to call into question the credentials of another parent. A parent with an adult Autistic son teaching her for nearly 20 years what Autism is. As opposed to the books written by neurotypical thinkers about what Autism is and more to the point what typical-thinkers don’t want Autism to be. I think we all know who the experts are. Uninformed professionals trying to assimilate Autistic people ARE NOT experts, no matter if they are credentialed to be in a classroom. For those that haven’t bothered to notice there is a whole world of Autistic adults out here some raising their own Autistic children. What of their credentials? They are THE experts. They are amazing friends and are so much more aware of the realities of Autism than any one non-Autistic believing they are credentialed in Autism.

    Teachers and other professionals are intimidated by real knowledge as it doesn’t’ fit into their old tired programs that do not work for Autistic thinkers. Autistic people deserve respect and innerstanding. Not disrespect, fear and misguided representations of who they are. Debra has worked with and for every type of Autistic individual out here. She has a vast knowledge of the spectrum at her core. I guess that is intimidating to the “phony experts.”

    • Debbie says:

      Kelly, well said. My best friends are Autistic adults and parents of Autistic people. Most Autistic people I know have no malice. The experts on Autism are Autistic people.

  • Marian says:

    I pray that God would comfort all your souls while going through this difficult time. Unless you have lived with beautiful people with mental disorders it can be hard to understand the challenges and truly have the patience of a saint. And God will reward saints that stand up for those beautiful people who don’t always have a voice.

  • A few months ago, I wrote a post Don’t Blame Students for Teacher’s Exhaustion. I gave only one example from my son’s program. but the same scenario kept repeating itself over and over during 18 years my son was at school. Bad programs kept destroying my son , the good teachers kept resurrecting him. It is mind boggling how many teachers are not even able to accept the diagnosis and deal with it properly. Many teachers don’t like their children,their job. they don’t believe in a value of special education.
    http://krymarh.wordpress.com/2013/10/08/dont-blame-students-for-teachers-exhaustion/

  • My friends have informed me that next week the full police report can be released to all. My understanding is that it contains better information and will shed light on so many questions. I didn’t think these types of things were public record, but I’m told they are, great isn’t it? A complete sequence of events. Others with inquiring minds will be enlightened and since we want the same thing this should finally put to rest a lot of the questions for everyone. Great news for people near and far I’m sure.

    • Debbie says:

      What are you talking about? I have the Sheriff’s report. They recommended downgrading this. The D.A. didn’t pursue this as a criminal case. I’m not posting the Los Angeles Times Article, Lynette. Be grateful, I took it down.

  • Debra says:

    I am disgusted, but not surprised that this occurred. You see I am autistic. And while I experienced discrimination when I was growing up because of ignorant, and hateful people. I never experienced anything like this. And as a woman with Aspergers Syndrome, as a mother raising two daughters with Aspergers Syndrome; I can tell you this type of discrimination against those of us with Autism and Aspergers is only (and will only) continue to increase.

    This is happening because Vanderbilt university took it upon their selves to disregard years of research, results, and proven to be affective treatments for Autism … and say that Autism is no longer a Neurological disorder… but now is a mental ILLNESS.

    As a result of this, we are no longer allowed to serve our country in the military. We will now be under ‘increased’ scrutiny because people with a ‘mental illness’ are not considered to be ‘equal’ to others in the community. Soon we may not even be welcome in the work force … as we are now considered to be ‘mentally ill’ … and therefore incompetent to carry out normal tasks.

    I wish I could tell your son that it’ll get better. Sadly (as I’ve dealt with discrimination myself – with the Attorney General in NM who is now running for Governor … refused to do a thing about it), I can’t.

    Those of us with Autism, those of us with relatives with Autism must stick together. Because the fact is, these are dangerous times for us (as we are not considered to be ‘equal’ under the law)!

    • Debbie says:

      I agree we need to stick together. There are people who are intent on criminalizing both autism and mental illness.

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